Termites and Teak Wood Garden Furniture

Termites and Teak Wood Garden Furniture

Teak wood has rightfully been identified as one of the best, if not the outright best, wood type for outdoor furniture, for several reasons. It is durable, so any furniture made using this wood is sure to have an impressive life-span, as would be required of those of your furniture pieces which would be placed in your backyard, on the decking or patio, in your courtyard, and perhaps even on your front porch.

Teak wood is also a pleasure to work with if you ask the manufacturers of any wood products, particularly specialists in the design, manufacture and retail of teak garden furniture. Some of the products that are fashioned out of teak wood are truly impressive, bearing testimony to the physical properties of teak wood being just right to create great-looking pieces that last long too. In fact, with the right care, teak wood furniture can last an entire lifetime, even in the case that it would be outdoor or garden furniture.

It’s most likely to be outdoor furniture in any case because it would be somewhat of a waste to have teak wood go into indoor furniture, which typically follows a design pattern that has the wooden bits concealed. The appearance of teak wouldn’t go well with something like a dining room setting, for instance.

Another important property that in a sense adds to the durability of teak wood is that of how it appears to be resistant to destructive pests such as termites. Termites have long since made for the ultimate nemesis of outdoor furniture and other wooden structures, posing a threat even bigger than that of the elements.

Is teak wood really termite-resistant though?

Yes and no!

Teak wood isn’t really resistant to termites or any other pests for that matter, which is why you do indeed get some very rare cases of teak garden furniture owners complaining about having been sold dreams with regards to a damaging termite infestation. You get even more common cases of other pest infestations, like wasps nesting in a nice corner of some teak wood furniture they can find, which might include the likes of teak wood planters, patio desks and chairs, etc.

Generally, though pests such as wasps would prefer more elevated wooden structures, but back to the termites, which would naturally likely make for the biggest concern.

So it’s simply a case of termites harbouring a natural and instinctive preference for certain types of wood, of which teak isn’t a preference. It’s not that termites will never invade anything made of teak wood at all, but they’d only really do so if they really had to.

If there are termites in or about your garden, treat them to some strategic hospitality in making available to them pretty much any other type of wood which they can attack first before even thinking of going for your prized teak pieces. That’s just a way of checking if there is indeed a termite threat, in which case you can then make provision for its removal, long before your teak pieces suffer damage.